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SToons Music
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Joined: 03/01/2018 - 02:48
A Not So Crappy Modular Cello (and violin)

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OK so it's a little crappy. But not totally. And maybe it's closer to a contrabass? Will post a better explanation of this thingamajig later, gonna take a few minutes.

It's basically two WG's, one slightly detuned by the Sub Osc. The MiniLFO creates the slight vibrato, you can increase it via it's Out knob.

The 2 WG's are then mixed in the upper left mixer. From there they feed four very resonant band-pass filters tuned to approx. 300, 700, 2k and 4kHz. These somewhat mimic the resonant body of a string instrument (actually a violin but WTF, still sounds ok, will experiment more later). The 4 filtered outputs are then mixed back with the 2 WG's in the bottom mixer.

If you turn the marked mixer Out to zero you will hear just the 2 WG's without the faux "resonant body". Pretty cool how much of a difference it makes.

And yes, yes I did throw this together after watching the season premiere of Game of Thrones. Surprised? Wait till you find out they killed Arya!

UncleAfx
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Joined: 03/06/2016 - 20:08
Pretty cool man. Probably the

Pretty cool man. Probably the closest thing I've heard to a cello with the modular so far.

SToons Music
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Joined: 03/01/2018 - 02:48
Needs tweaking but getting

Needs tweaking but getting there.

Thanks for the comment, Unc.

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animeforthewholelife
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Joined: 09/08/2016 - 08:57
Its convincing, I like the

Its convincing, I like the attack modulation you did there ^^ Keep up the amazing work.

SToons Music
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Joined: 03/01/2018 - 02:48
So I used this article as a

So I used this article as a reference point:

https://www.soundonsound.com/techniques/practical-bowed-string-synthesis

Since there is no "resonant filter bank" in the ModSynth it seemed one alternative was to set up several resonant band-pass filters instead.

The ModSynth here is not laid out in a particularly intelligent way but it started as an experiment, kept adding elements to see what was happening, and due to the time consumed in "tuning" the resonance I haven't had time to re-think the flow and fix it.

To tune the 4 resonant freq listed in the article (Figure 2b) this was used as reference:

http://pages.mtu.edu/~suits/notefreqs.html

As an example, the lowest resonant freq is 300 Hz. That falls between a D4 and a D#4. Setting up a WG playing that note, it was put into a mixer and alongside it was white noise thru the BP filter with resonance on full. Then by carefully sweeping the filter it was possible to match the freq from the WG.

There are several ways to control the response. As a note or notes increase in volume on an actual stringed instrument it means the pressure from the bow on the strings is increasing causing more resonance from the body as I understand it. I hadn't thought it out well before but automating the upper left mixer Out is a good way to achieve expressiveness as that controls the main feed into the BP filters - the instruments "resonant body".

Altering the waveshape is another method, the one I used in previous examples.

One other is to slightly feed the FM of one WG.

Each method will produce different types of timbres so there is some flexibility there, especially used in conjunction to changing velocity, attack time etc.

Probably several other ways to add a sense of realism, kinda cool to think about.

UncleAfx
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Joined: 03/06/2016 - 20:08
Nice. I'm especially

Nice. I'm especially interested in how you tuned the frequencies.
There's a calculator on this page if you you scroll down that will give the exact note plus cents for any frequency.

http://www.sengpielaudio.com/calculator-centsratio.htm

For example, 300Hz is D4 and 36.95 cents. :)
...if that level of precision even matters.

The only way I know to dial it in that exact anyway is with the pcmsynth, then maybe match to that. Unless I'm over-thinking...

SToons Music
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Joined: 03/01/2018 - 02:48
Yeah, I suspect you're over

Yeah, I suspect you're over-thinking lol. I highly doubt all stringed instrument types, say all violas, are going to have the exact same resonant frequencies, probably if you tested 10 of the same model you'd have variations. Plus you can't dial that exact freq up in any of Caustic's synths to a fraction and the BP filters aren't that precise. But ears, those glorious semi-appendages, they're pretty remarkable. Or you can do the sine wave honking thing.

As an example... as soon as you move the Cutoff knob you'll hear the difference, especially the second ModS. Dumbass me used noise before I read the whole article and of course as soon as I came to the honking it was like doh! I knew that, I've accidentally done it countless times.

So I noticed that when the cello hit the 8th measure each time, a low D not so surprisingly, it kinda resonates too much (osc, too loud etc) so by tweaking that specific BP filter, In 2 of the 6 channel, just a tiny bit back, it makes a big difference. Very sensitive.

Edited 2 minutes later when I realized you can use the Res knob for it's intended purpose instead of twaddling with the mixer, or if it suited, alter the tuning(s)

Would be cool to look up the resonant freq of different instruments, models, whatever is out there. I'm finding this area really fascinating in terms of kinda faux modeling in the Modsynth.

Like this - " Resonance and Radiation of Acoustic Instruments"

http://www.co-bw.com/Audio_resonance_radiation.htm

Apparantly the "wolf tone" I referred to happens to be an actual problem with the cello. Interesting article.

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nitro27
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Joined: 10/11/2015 - 18:27
W O W. This is super close,

W O W. This is super close, and I've spent a fair bit of time with my cello. Super versatile, too. Cool that it fits in one Modsynth.

I make Chillout Electronic Music, and sometimes Ambient. http://floatingbeyond.tk
https://soundcloud.com/floatingbeyond